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How long does the pain last?

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  • How long does the pain last?

    I've seen many desperate posts from people giving up, declaring that after 1 day, 2 days, 3 days, a week, a month, 3 months etc. They are tearing their hair out and about to murder their husband, wife, boss, teacher, lover, etc. This often seems to be accompanied by other personal problems, but for the sake of the example, let's restrict the concept of cravings to psychologically well-adjusted human beings.

    While I can fully understand that the nicotine cravings are intense(?) during the first few days of withdrawal, and that psychological cravings may occur for a few weeks thereafter, I'm wondering what accounts for the longer-term relapse rates and the abundance of people claiming that they are "going nuts" after several months of having quit. Statistically, I think it would be interesting to plot the cross-over point between the population having given up and those feeling confident that they will never start again, but also to explore the strange phenomenon of the emperically high number of outliers who never quite seem to "make it".

    In your opinion, how long does the pain last, on average?

  • #2
    The answer I can give you is to have a look at the website about 'Symptoms' in my signature, in there you will find some answers to your questions.

    Best wishes you are doing a great job.

    Jackie
    Stopped 9 December 2008

    www.whyquit.com
    www.woofmang.com
    http://talesfromthequit.com/you-come-too
    http://www.ffn.yuku.com/topic/12514
    http://whyquit.com/whyquit/A_Symptoms.html
    http://talesfromthequit.com/the-terrible-threes
    http://www.truthwillout.co.uk/read

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Jackie, I realize that and I have already done much reading. I am especially interested in personal experience feedback.

      Comment


      • #4
        Handiman, I hope you don't mind me being blunt, but It seems to me from this and other posts that you somehow doubt the veracity of those who claim to have powerful cravings - and consequent temptation to smoke - a long way down the line.

        Yet, as you say, the statistics would certainly suggest that there is a lot more to a successful quit than negotiating nicotene withdrawal.

        The mind is a powerful thing. And a brain that has been conditioned over many years - often decades - to associate smoking with virtually every social situation, activity, or emotional state is capable of creating subconscious triggers that can feel just as powerful as actual nicotene withdrawal, if not more so. I consider myself to be 'psychologically well adjusted' but I am still getting some days where I have cravings that make me want to cry.

        No doubt some are more susceptible than others to cravings. I would imagine it is dependent on any number of factors. And if you are one of those that are easily able to brush off occasional impulse to smoke, then you should count yourself lucky. But please, please be careful of your tone before you imply that others are merely looking for sympathy, or 'taking the p*ss' (as I noticed in another post). Everyone's quit journey is personal, their emotions are raw and their sufferings are real.

        On the plus side, the longer you stay quit the better your statistical chances of succeeding. And a positive attitude to the craving certainly helps in overcoming them. As does being part of a supportive community like this one. So here's to all of us still being smoke free for a lifetime.

        Helen
        Last edited by Moderator 2; 27-01-2011, 02:43 PM. Reason: Amended the swear word
        Smoked for 24 years
        Quitting method: cold turkey
        Last smoked 22/12/10

        "When it comes to silencing the inner voice, the secret is repeated conscious choice."
        - Woofmang Tales from the Quit. To read the whole article, click here. What the man says is TRUE:
        http://talesfromthequit.com/silencing-the-inner-voice

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Helsbelles View Post
          Handiman, I hope you don't mind me being blunt, but It seems to me from this and other posts that you somehow doubt the veracity of those who claim to have powerful cravings - and consequent temptation to smoke - a long way down the line.

          Yet, as you say, the statistics would certainly suggest that there is a lot more to a successful quit than negotiating nicotene withdrawal.

          The mind is a powerful thing. And a brain that has been conditioned over many years - often decades - to associate smoking with virtually every social situation, activity, or emotional state is capable of creating subconscious triggers that can feel just as powerful as actual nicotene withdrawal, if not more so. I consider myself to be 'psychologically well adjusted' but I am still getting some days where I have cravings that make me want to cry.

          No doubt some are more susceptible than others to cravings. I would imagine it is dependent on any number of factors. And if you are one of those that are easily able to brush off occasional impulse to smoke, then you should count yourself lucky. But please, please be careful of your tone before you imply that others are merely looking for sympathy, or 'taking the ****' (as I noticed in another post). Everyone's quit journey is personal, their emotions are raw and their sufferings are real.

          On the plus side, the longer you stay quit the better your statistical chances of succeeding. And a positive attitude to the craving certainly helps in overcoming them. As does being part of a supportive community like this one. So here's to all of us still being smoke free for a lifetime.

          Helen
          Couldn't have said it better myself
          Smoked for : 38 years
          Quitting method: Warm Turkey (Nicorette Inhalator)
          Last smoked : 31/12/2010 at 23:55
          ---------------
          Never be afraid to try something new, remember....
          Amateurs built the 'Ark'... but Professionals built the 'Titanic' !!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by HandIMan View Post
            I've seen many desperate posts from people giving up, declaring that after 1 day, 2 days, 3 days, a week, a month, 3 months etc. They are tearing their hair out and about to murder their husband, wife, boss, teacher, lover, etc. This often seems to be accompanied by other personal problems, but for the sake of the example, let's restrict the concept of cravings to psychologically well-adjusted human beings.

            While I can fully understand that the nicotine cravings are intense(?) during the first few days of withdrawal, and that psychological cravings may occur for a few weeks thereafter, I'm wondering what accounts for the longer-term relapse rates and the abundance of people claiming that they are "going nuts" after several months of having quit. Statistically, I think it would be interesting to plot the cross-over point between the population having given up and those feeling confident that they will never start again, but also to explore the strange phenomenon of the emperically high number of outliers who never quite seem to "make it".

            In your opinion, how long does the pain last, on average?
            I'm afraid i am not sure .... sorry Handiman

            But with out sounding rude, you really do sound like and remind me of MichaelF
            " IF at first you dont succeed, try and try again"

            Trying again is something i am good at... succeeding is another story......... but this time it will be different!!!


            ~~~~~~~~~~~~ Goodbye Fags and Welcome Back Money~~~~~~~~~~~

            LAST CIG SMOKED 10PM 20TH OCTOBER

            Comment


            • #7
              I can manage blunt and rude

              Still, a real opinion on the question rather than just about the author's intention would be nice.

              Comment


              • #8
                I would have thought my opinion was implicit in my response. However... I think the pain can last for months, it just depends on the person.

                For what it's worth, having read around the forum, for most people things really start improving after upwards of three months. At least I ****** hope they do.

                However, even for those who get that far the odd nasty craving can crop up even after a year or more, it's just not such a constant thing.
                Smoked for 24 years
                Quitting method: cold turkey
                Last smoked 22/12/10

                "When it comes to silencing the inner voice, the secret is repeated conscious choice."
                - Woofmang Tales from the Quit. To read the whole article, click here. What the man says is TRUE:
                http://talesfromthequit.com/silencing-the-inner-voice

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by snow33 View Post
                  I'm afraid i am not sure .... sorry Handiman

                  But with out sounding rude, you really do sound like and remind me of MichaelF
                  Thought that myself - style very similar - still nothing wrong with that!!

                  Quit Date: 9th November 2010

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=HandIMan;210498]I can manage blunt and rude

                    QUOTE]

                    That we had noticed
                    Stop date: 10-05-12 @ 7.50 am

                    Method: Lozenges, Wurthers Originals, Deep breathing, Will Power, Health, Love of a good man.....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      OMG...........it's back

                      Oh please no....just when we all thought it was safe to go back into the forum
                      Smoked 25+ a day for 21 years
                      Quit Monday 15th November 2010
                      Using Champix - Lasted just under 6 months

                      New quit date - 8pm 1st July 2012

                      Aiming to pay off my debts with the money saved and go to the caribbean for my 45th birthday instead

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It's alright, we're all cheery here! xxx
                        Smoked for 24 years
                        Quitting method: cold turkey
                        Last smoked 22/12/10

                        "When it comes to silencing the inner voice, the secret is repeated conscious choice."
                        - Woofmang Tales from the Quit. To read the whole article, click here. What the man says is TRUE:
                        http://talesfromthequit.com/silencing-the-inner-voice

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Indeed we are
                          Stop date: 10-05-12 @ 7.50 am

                          Method: Lozenges, Wurthers Originals, Deep breathing, Will Power, Health, Love of a good man.....

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            It is strange the NSD experience. I am hoping for some serious answers to pertinent questions but I only find so far people who want to make fun. It is not a good way to make any progress. Such a pity.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              But Michael (sorry handiman or whoever), we are here to support each other as people giving up/recently given up smoking. Not to answer your thesis questions, or market research or whatever high brow questions you think are relevant.

                              People on here want to be able to relate to others. At the moment, for someone who has apparently according to a previous post of yours, been quit for about the same time as me, I cannot relate to anything you are saying. What 'progress' do you hope to make by asking these ridiculous questions??

                              The only progress that I am hoping for, is that I can carry on being a non smoker....which I have acheived so far mostly down to champix and willpower, but also mainly due to people on this forum.

                              To be quite honest..post like yours do not help and are not productive...they only serve to upset people who are wavering in their quits. As such, these posts are not needed on a stop smoking forum.....maybe someone could direct you to a pro smoking one.
                              Smoked 25+ a day for 21 years
                              Quit Monday 15th November 2010
                              Using Champix - Lasted just under 6 months

                              New quit date - 8pm 1st July 2012

                              Aiming to pay off my debts with the money saved and go to the caribbean for my 45th birthday instead

                              Comment

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